Feeling bad about feeling bad can make you feel worse.

Embracing your darker moods can actually make you feel better, in the long run, psychologists find. Pressure to feel upbeat can make you feel downbeat while embracing your darker moods can actually make you feel better in the long run, according to surprising new research.… [read more]

Why people tolerate politicians’ lies.

Why do political figures appear to be able to get away with mild truth bending and sometimes even outrageous lies? This is, of course, a really important question at the moment. However it doesn’t just apply to politicians. It’s not just a DT thing.… [read more]

Believing the future will be favorable may prevent action now.

People tend to believe that others will inevitably come around to their point of view over time, according to findings from a series of studies published in the journal Psychological Science. The findings show that this “belief in a favorable future” holds across various contexts and cultures, shedding light on some of the causes and consequences, the researchers say, of the political polarization evident today.… [read more]

Women show cognitive advantage in gender-equal countries.

Women show cognitive advantage in gender-equal countries. In fact female advantage in cognitive performance is highest in Sweden, which has the greatest gender equality, according to a new study.

What the researchers say: Women’s cognitive functioning past middle age may be affected by the degree of gender equality in the country in which they live, according to the research.… [read more]

Women and men report similar levels of work-family conflicts.

Contrary to public perception and many media accounts, women and men report similar levels of work-family conflicts, both in the form of work interfering with family and family interfering with work, according to new research.

What the researchers say: Researchers spent several years examining the findings from more than 350 studies conducted over three decades that included more than 250,000 participants from across the world.… [read more]

Using money to buy time linked to increased happiness.

New, and really interesting, research is challenging the age-old adage that money can’t buy happiness.

The study, led by researchers at the University of British Columbia and Harvard Business School, suggests that using money to buy free time—such as paying to delegate household chores like cleaning and cooking—is linked to greater life satisfaction.… [read more]

Aboriginal community with strong ethno-cultural identity and connection to the land has lower suicide rates

Aboriginal community with strong ethno-cultural identity and connection to the land has lower suicide rates, and higher resilience.  A study investigating the mental health perceptions and practices of an Aboriginal community in northern Ontario, and its significantly lower rates of mental health services utilization and suicide, suggests that a strong ethno cultural identity and connection to the land are significant factors to positive mental health outcomes.… [read more]